DCPLive is a blog by library staff at the DeKalb County Public Library!

May 2013

May 31 2013

ShareReads: Groundbreaking Reads

by ShareReads

Adult Summer Reading-Groundbreaking ReadsThe DeKalb County Public Library kicks off its 6th Annual Summer Reading for Adults program beginning May 25 and ending July 31, 2013. This year’s theme is Groundbreaking Reads. Hold up before you panic and think this is going to be a labor intensive task of critiquing books and a writing mini-dissertation. To the contrary, it’s as easy as 1, 2, and 3. Truly, just record three book titles or attend a branch book discussion or read/comment on our weekly ShareReads blog post (posted every Friday right here on DCPLive) or any combination of the three and be registered to win gift certificates from area DeKalb restaurants and a gift bag full of good books and goodies. Allof these activities make you eligible to enter into the reading program. I realize that summer is a time of travel, fun with family, gardening and for some just plain ol’ leisure. Therefore, if reading isn’t your thing ?feel free to listen to an audiobook or attend and listen to an interesting book discussion being held at one of our library branches. Don’t delay. Register online or at your closest branch and participate in our 6th Annual Summer Reading for Adults reading program.

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May 29 2013

Mark your calendars!

by Dea Anne M

On September 23 1957, 3 years after the U.S. Supreme Court declared via Brown vs Board of Education that all laws establishing segregated schools were unconstitutional, nine African American students enrolled in Little Rock Central High School in Little Rock, Arkansas. The tumultuous events that preceded and followed this event have become generally known as the Little Rock Integration Crisis. Someone who played a leading role during this time, and in times to come, was Daisy Bates (November 11, 1914 – November 4, 1999). Elected president of the Arkansas branch of the NAACP in 1952, Mrs. Bates, along with her husband L. C. Bates, was a very important figure in the African American community of Little Rock. Their newspaper, the Arkansas State Press, whose first issue appeared on May 9, 1941, was a voice for civil rights well before a nationally recognized movementemerged. Mrs. Bates acted as advisor and guide to the students who became know as the Little Rock Nine.The Bates’ newspaper suffered such a loss of advertising revenue during and after these events that they were forced to stop publishing in 1959 but Mrs. Bates went on to do important work in New York City and Washington DC. In 1988, the reprint of her 1962 memoir The Long Shadow of Little Rock (which was initially banned throughout the South) won a National Bookrock Award.

On Saturday, June 8th, the Stonecrest branch of DCPL will proudly host Janis F. Kearney the author of Daisy: Between a Rock and a Hard Place. Kearney, who was 16 when she met Bates, paints a vivid and compelling picture of a true legend, a woman ahead of her time during a fascinating, and for many dangerous, period of our nation’s history. Ms. Kearney, a highly respected scholar, served as Presidential Diarist to President Bill Clinton from 1995 to 2001 and is the author of the memoir Cotton Field of Dreams which tells of her childhood growing up as one of 17 children born to poor sharecroppers who encouraged their children to succeed through hard work, education and bold dreams. Funding for this very special event is provided by the Friends of the Stonecrest Library and the City of Lithonia and will take place from 2:00 pm to 4:00 pm. Please be sure not to miss this exciting author talk!Little Rock

For more background on Daisy Bates, check out The Power of One: Daisy Bates and the Little Rock Nine by Judith Bloom Fradin and Dennis Brindell Fradin and to learn more about the Little Rock Integration Crisis be sure not miss Turn Away Thy Son: Little Rock, the crisis that rocked the nation by Elizabeth Jacoway

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May 22 2013

The Library of Unborrowed Books

by Jesse M

The Library of Unborrowed Books

The Library of Unborrowed Books, a project by Stockholm-based artist Meri?lg??ingborg, displays hundreds of books that have never been borrowed from the Center for Fiction’s library, calling into question what subjects in any contemporary moment have ?urrency’ or desirability, and bringing attention to topics and stories that have been temporarily overlooked.

The concept made its debut in 2012 at the Stockholm Public Library in Sweden, where it aroused great public and critical interest. For the project’s second iteration, Meri?lg??ingborg will make selections of unborrowed books from the Center for Fiction. These books will then go on institutional loan to Art in General for the public to access.

The artist explains:

“This work…comprises books from a selected library that have never been borrowed. The framework…hints at what has been disregarded, knowledge essentially unconsumed, and puts on display what has eluded us.

For more information and photos, follow this link to Art in General’s exhibition page on the installation.

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May 20 2013

We Want to Hear From You!

by Jimmy L

Dear DCPLive readers. Whether you are a long-time reader or a one-time visitor, whether you are reading because you are a DCPL fan or a non-DeKalb resident who found us while web-surfing, we want to hear from you! DCPLive has been going strong for about 5 years, posting on average three times a week, but we only have a vague notion of who our readers are. So help us get to know you better and let us know what direction to take in the future by taking our survey. It only takes about 3 minutes, and all questions are optional.

dcplive_survey

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May 10 2013

Mama said… a lot

by Veronica W

In 1961 the Shirelles, a girls singing group, had a moderately successful hit with the song “Mama Said There’d Be Days Like This.” However most of us knowGlass-5442_fs that mothers have a lot more to say than that. Even when I became an adult, my mother and Inever engaged in cozy, confidential chats. She acknowledged the factI was grown, but she always remained the elder. Dictates became helpful hints, suggestions and “good life counsel,” which she implicitly indicated I would be wise to follow. Being southern by orientation, if not inclination, many of her pearls were couched in folksy sayings,some of which my sisters and I compiled into amemory book. Here are just a few.

  • You can sift and sift and still get the husks. (Translation: It doesn’t pay to be too fussy)
  • Pretty is as pretty does (Translation: Looks aren’t everything)
  • You better save those tears?ou’re going to need them later (Translation: Don’t cry about trivial matters)
  • If it’s on your back, it’s not in the bank (Translation: Don’t dress to impress)
  • Make sure you have walls before you try to paint (Translation: Don’t try to improve a boyfriend who acts worthless)
  • Cow’s going to need his tail come fly time (Translation:Treat everyone well. You never know when you have to ask them for help.)

Susan Sarandon in Anywhere But Here. Doris Roberts in Raymond. Freaky Friday, Steel Magnolias, The Glass Menagerie…the list of mothers andtheir sense (and yes, sometimes non-sense) is almost endless. Sometimes memories of the things our mothers said are foggy or clouded by childhood impressions. However, there may be one or two thingsyou find yourself saying which are, to your amazement, amusement or horror,your mother’s. Perhapsyou knowof a book ormovie full of “momisms.” If so, please share. Remember, Mama said “If you do good, good will follow you.”

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May 8 2013

Let the flames begin!

by Dea Anne M

The month of May is Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month as well as Older Americans Month and DCPL will be celebrating both with many exciting special programs and presentations. What you may not know, is that May is also National Barbecue Month. I am by no means what you’d call the “outdoor type” but each year when spring arrives I feel myself irresistably drawn to cooking on the grill. Now I don’t know that it’s true that everything tastes better outdoors. A piping hot bowl of chili , for example, probably doesn’t gain in appeal when consumed in 90-plus heat but I do believe that there are certain delicious flavors that grilling enhances. There are the standards, of course, such as steaks, chicken, and burgers but I also favor vegetables like zuchinni, eggplant and peppers cooked to carmelized perfection. I like to grill slices of pineapple and serve them on vanilla ice cream. I’ve even grilled pizzas – a production to be sure and the pies never come out perfectly round – but the result is delicious and the heat of the grill produces a crust redolent of char and crispiness to rival that produced by a professional pizza oven.

Do you like to grill when the weather starts to warm up? Do you favor gas or charcoal? (Believe me, that’s a more than lively debate inbible some circles). What’s your favorite food to cook on the grill? Do you need ideas and inspiration? As always, DCPL can help.

Culinary writer Steve Raichlen is widely acknowledged as an authority on grilling and his book The  Barbecue! Bible is a 500 page plus guide to everything grilled. Raichlen provides recipes from around the globe for grilled dishes and their accompaniments. Grilled Snails might be a hard sell around my house but I suspect that Pancetta Grilled Figs followed by Lamb and Eggplant Kebabs would be met with enthusiasm.myron

The world of competition barbecue is certainly hot these days and throughout the country teams with names like “Squeal of Approval” and “Albert Einswine” vie for money, trophies, and glory at barbecue “opens” and on reality television. One of the best known names on the circuits is Myron Mixon and his book Smokin’ With Myron Mixon: recipes made simple from the winningest man in barbecue could be a good introduction to those who are new to grilling and barbecuing. Mixon’s motto is “keep it simple” and he follows through with clear cut instructions and techniques that will help anyone from grilling tyro to barbecue wizard turn out succulent ‘cue.vegan

Lest anyone brand me as biased toward meat, let me steer you toward Grilling Vegan Style: 125 fired-up recipes to turn every bite into a backyard barbecue by John Schlimm. Packed with recipes and color photographs, Schlimm’s book is definitely not just for vegans. I don’t know about you but Grilled Vegetables and Foccacia and Flame Kissed Eggplant with Hoisin Sauce sound absolutely scrumptious. For more great vegetable-centric recipes and techniques, be sure to check out The Gardener and the Grill: the bounty of the garden meets the sizzle of the grill by Karen Adler and Judith Fertig.pizza

Finally, you might want to give grilling pizza a whirl this spring and summer (I recommend that you do). Be sure to check out Pizza On the Grill: 100 fiesty fire-roasted recipes for pizza & more by Elizabeth Karmel and Bob Blumer. Filled with gorgeous photographs, the book includes a concise, and very useful, chapter on basic techniques and equipment. Many of the pizza bear names like “Magic Mushroom Medley” and “Lucy in the Sky with Pizza”, just in case that’s your thing. Even if it isn’t t you’ll find enough alluring recipes for pizza and the “go-withs” to keep you happily grilling for months to come.

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London Public LibraryIn the past, we’ve posted about Google Street View, a subset of the Google Maps service which lets you explore places around the world through 360-degree, panoramic, and street-level imagery. But did you know that now Google Street View is now offering their service indoors as well?

Since late 2011 Google has been offering interior tours of buildings via their Street View technology. Businesses can voluntarily access the program and Google’s photographers will schedule a photo shoot inside the building. Some of the earliest adopters of this new service have been bookstores and libraries.

The website Ebook Friendly has an informative and interactive post where you can learn more about the program and then tour 10 libraries which have already been given the Street View treatment.

In related news: two DeKalb County Public Library branches (Decatur and Salem Panola) are now available through Google’s new indoor Google Maps project–not exactly Street View, but similar. It allows you to see a floor plan of the inside of the library, with different sections of the library labelled clearly. Also, since this feature is still in beta, some of the details may still be buggy, and the labels may look different depending on the mobile device you are using. More branch floor plans will become available soon.

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