DCPLive is a blog by library staff at the DeKalb County Public Library!

January 2017

Jan 25 2017

The Book and Its Cover

by Camille B

“The book cover is the window to your book’s soul.”   

Book Image 3

Book Image 5Book Image

Book Image 2Book Image 6

Book Image 4


 

 

 

 

They say never judge a book by the cover– well, I do it all the time. I know that I shouldn’t. I know each book stands on its own merit, appealing cover or not, but I find myself being swayed anyway. I’m sure that in spite of your best efforts you do too; whether it’s the cool jacket or intriguing title, you find yourself passing over the blander looking dust jackets to pick up the ones that seem more enticing.

Even though those covers have misled us before. They either promised pages filled with intrigue and adventure and never delivered, or the book looked really dull on the outside and turned out to be fantastic!

So why is this? Why is it that against our better judgment we find ourselves drawn to book covers on the library and bookstore shelves that appeal to the eyes; without even checking the blurb on the inside to see what the books are about? Probably even robbing ourselves in the process, because who knows, that ugly looking book with the brown cover might turn out to be quite an interesting read.

According to an article in the Huffington Post, a book cover is the first thing a potential reader sees and it can make a lasting impression. “Our brains are wired to process images faster than words, when we see an image, it makes us feel something, a great cover can help the reader instantly recognize that this book is for them.”

So it’s human nature to have our curiosity piqued by pretty or unusual book covers. You should feel better knowing it’s not entirely your fault. It is the publisher’s job to lure you in with fancy and captivating book covers, using intriguing teasers and taglines, contrasting colors, and paying careful attention to details such as font style and text placement all in the purpose of getting you to pick up the book and take a closer look.

Does the cover actually sell the book? One blogger puts it this way “The front cover sells the back, the back cover sells the flap and by then you’ve sold the book.” Well, yes and no, because for me personally the blurb is the deciding factor; because pretty cover or not, if it doesn’t interest me, I’m not buying it.

There are some who won’t even get as far as reading the blurb on the inside of the book because they’re so turned off by its hideous cover. Says Naomi Blackburn, one of the world’s top  Goodreads reviewer and columnist for The Author CEO, “If the cover seems to be nothing more than a catalog photograph with block lettering, I bypass it,” she says. “If the author didn’t care enough to dedicate time/effort to their cover, I wonder how much time they put into the book itself.” 

And I agree. I think the cover should have appeal and make a potential customer or library patron want to pick it up. But what about those authors who don’t have a say in the design of their book covers? Because the truth is most of them don’t; just ask Anne Rice who’s Facebook fans were not too thrilled with the cover of her book Prince Lestat which they felt did not represent the story. “I have no control,” she said in her response. “Never have had. Of all the covers on my books over the years, I have liked a few”

And this is true of many authors. I guess for some it comes down to a matter of trust and loyalty after being with a publisher for so long, and depending on the working relationship they have together or contract in place. They may, or may not have approval  for the consulting and cover of their book. Sometimes they like the covers, sometimes they don’t, but at the end of the day it’s all just one of the realities of the publishing world.

So whether a book cover is flashy, lame, witty or simply leaves us with a question mark hanging over our heads, we have to admit that in today’s competitive world of book publishing they’ve made the phrase “Don’t judge a book by the cover” pretty darn hard to do.

Here is a survey that was taken to try and determine how much influence a book cover actually has in helping a customer decide whether to buy it or not.

Here are some other interesting links about book covers:

 18 Modern Redesigns of Classic Book Covers That Will Make You Want To Read Them Again

  50 of the Coolest Book Covers

Below are some suggested titles that you can find in our DCPL collection:

Book 2

Book Cover 3

 

 

 

 

Book design made simple- Fiona Raven & Glenna Collett

Creating the cover for your graphic novel– Frank Lee

Do you have a favorite book cover?

 

 

 

{ 1 comment }

Jan 23 2017

Sock Monkey Mind

by Dea Anne M

Many of us resolve to “do better” at the beginning of each year and for some that means losing weight, getting more exercise, or quitting an undesirable habit. What can happen though is that we dive into our new life style in a full-tilt manner only to find out (again) that most of us live lives which are subject to disruption and change. Too often, we experience a setback, see this as proof of our failure and then give up. It’s happened to me often enough that I resolved several years back not to make resolutions.

Well, this year has been a little different. It isn’t that I’ve made a bunch of, or any, actual resolutions, but I have decided that I want to slow down and be a little kinder to myself. One way that I’m doing that is by starting a meditation practice. Already I’ve been impressed with what a difference it’s made in how I feel – and more importantly – how I react not only to everyday stresses but the little surprises that life has a way of throwing at us. It is a practice that I can recommend without reservation. I’d hesitate to say that it has changed my life except it kind of has.

Do you think you might be interested in exploring meditation for yourself? If so, DCPL has resources to help.

If you’re the kind of person who wants to do a little self-study before you dive in or you’re curious but don’t know if meditation is right for you here are some books for beginners:meditation

Mindfulness: an eight-week plan for finding peace in a frantic world by Mark Williams and Danny Penman

Meditation for Dummies by Stephen Bodian

Quiet Mind: a beginner’s guide to meditation compiled and edited by Susan Piver

whereverAnd here some sources that are widely considered classics in the field:

Wherever You Go, There You Are: mindfulness meditation in everyday life by Jon Kabat-Zinn

The Power of Now by Eckhart Tolle

Real Happiness: the power of meditation by Sharon Salzberg

If you have specific needs or concerns around meditation, be sure to check out the following:

In this country, African Americans overwhelmingly face issues and concerns that other people will rarely, or ever, be confronted with. Free Your Mind: an African American guide to meditation and freedom by Cortez R. Rainey addresses this reality with specific meditations and visualizations that freeencompass this reality.

Parents face specific challenges especially around helping children find mental health, happiness and security. If this is your situation, don’t miss Christopher Willard’s Growing Up Mindful: essential practices to help children, teens, and families find balance, calm and resilience.

Although all of the world’s major religions feature spiritual contemplation as a component, devout people can sometimes feel that the practice of meditation might run counter to what they believe. Christian Meditation: experiencing the presence of God by James Finley and Connecting to God: ancient kabbalah and modern psychology by Abner Weiss are two examples of resources available from DCPL that can help you explore these concerns.

happierFinally, let me wholeheartedly recommend Dan Harris’s wonderful 10% Happier: how I tamed the voice in my head, reduced stress without losing my edge, and found self-help that actually works.  Harris, a co-anchor on Nightline and a longtime professional in the pressure cooker that is network news, has a very active brain – a quality that many of us share. He was able to rise to the top of his profession yet at the same time developed ways to mask his anxiety to the extent that he finally experienced an intense, and very public, panic attack while he was on the air. If you’re curious about meditation, but remain skeptical, then this is the book for you. Harris is a very funny writer and utterly convincing as he chronicles his journey toward greater happiness and focus all by way of learning to quiet the voice inside of his head that he was convinced would never shut up.

Now about the title of this post – Buddhist tradition has a term for the mind that is restless, confused and inconstant from which comes many of our mental and spiritual anxieties and that term is “monkey mind.” Well, meditation is starting to turn my own monkey (i.e. busy brain) into something more closely resembling a sock monkey. It isn’t something I’m not cuddling up with it every second of the day, but it sure doesn’t keep me from falling asleep at night. Try it for yourself…and do let me know how it goes.

 

 

 

 

 

{ 1 comment }