DCPLive is a blog by library staff at the DeKalb County Public Library!
Feb 28 2017

Feeding America

by Camille B

OPEN_DOOR_SOUP_KITCHEN_122I came to the United States at the age of 34, still believing that no one in America ever went hungry. Growing up in Trinidad I had seen poverty aplenty, had lived with it and been surrounded by it for many years; but I was in America now, a land where there was more than enough for everyone to go around.
It didn’t take me long to realize that I had been quite naive and disillusioned in my thinking. The rose-colored glasses were swiftly snatched from my eyes, as I was forced to face the fact that America, like Trinidad, existed in a real world with real problems, and hunger was one of them.

For many, the problem of hunger is not a pleasant one, and conversations of this nature make them uncomfortable, not for lack of caring but because they probably feel helpless in the face of such overwhelming need. And if you’re a woman it’s worse, since as caregivers we would feed everybody, everywhere if you gave us the chance.

Since America already grows enough food to feed 10 billion people, it is indeed worrisome that there are so many who still go to bed hungry at night. Could waste be one of the factors? American Wasteland

In his book American Wasteland Jonathan Bloom states that everyday America wastes enough food to fill the Rose Bowl- the 90,000 seat football stadium in Pasadena, California. We squander between a quarter and a half of all the food produced in the United States-according to the Washington Post $165 billion in food each year. Now that’s a lot of food.

Can the bridge be gapped between waste and hunger? For example, if restaurants donated their leftovers at the end of  the night to give to the hungry and homeless, would that help create some type of balance?

Unfortunately, this is easier said than done. An article in the Huffington Post reported that a lot of restaurants are afraid of donating uneaten food for fear that they might get sued if someone gets sick. Since we do live in an age of lawsuits you can’t really blame them. However, according to that same article, these establishments have nothing to fear because the Good Samaritan Food Donation Act of 1996 protects donors from civil and criminal liability should the product donated in good faith later cause harm to the recipient, except for cases of “gross negligence or intentional misconduct.”

Because of this we are now seeing more and more restaurants stepping up to contribute in a significant way to the hungry and to the charitable organizations that feed them. It was very heartening to see places like Starbucks, Olive Garden and LongHorn Stakehouse donating food, that would have otherwise been thrown away, to such a worthy cause. Take a look here at this video clip https://www.aol.com/article/news/2016/07/26/these-restaurants-arent-letting-food-go-to-waste/21439044/

This year the Library partnered once again with the Atlanta Community Food Bank in their annual canned food drive which took place between January 23rd and February 17th. Barrels were placed at all library branches during this time for patrons to put their food donations whenever they visited during regular branch hours.

So even though the thoughts of hunger and homelessness can sometimes seem daunting and leave you feeling helpless, rest assured that you do not have to be a millionaire or donate lump sums to charity in order to make an impact for the cause. It’s the drops that fill the bucket.

Below is a list of various organizations that will be more than happy to accept your contributions of generosity, whether it be monetary, in the form of actual food items or some other form:

FoodPantries.org

FoodHelpUSA.com

-Dosomething.org

Georgia Food Oasis.org

Georgia Food Bank Association

The Atlanta Community Food Bank

These are just some in over 99 organizations set up to provide food assistance in the U.S.

 

 

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