DCPLive is a blog by library staff at the DeKalb County Public Library!

November 2018

Picture books about immigration and refugees allow us to experience the feelings of fear, courage, and hope that are part of the journey from one’s homeland to a new country. In these 11 picture books, young protagonists find themselves leaving old lands and journeying to new ones, where hope and promise live side-by-side with memories of what has been left behind.

We Came to America by Faith Ringgold

Award-winning author-illustrator Faith Ringgold offers a timely look at the diverse makeup and backgrounds of the American people and celebrates the country’s diverse immigrant heritage. Ringgold’s poetic text and vibrant art affirm the message that diversity enriches us all.

The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson

Other students laugh when Rigoberto, an immigrant from Venezuela, introduces himself. But later, he meets Angelina and discovers that he is not the only one who feels like an outsider. A beautiful and inclusive story that encourages children to find the beauty in their own lives and share it with the world.

Mustafa by Marie-Louise Gay

A young boy named Mustafa has traveled a long way to this country from his old one, where the trees were dusty and gray and there was not a lot of extra food. Here, he visits a park near his new home and finds beautiful flowers, ladybugs, fall leaves, and finally, a friend.

Islandborn by Junot Díaz

Lola was just a baby when her family left the Island. When she has to draw it for a school assignment, she asks her family, friends, and neighbors about their memories of her homeland. However, their memories of home are not all happy – there is also a remembrance of struggles.

Imagine by Juan Felipe Herrera

When Juan Felipe Herrera was very young, he picked flowers, helped his mama feed the chickens, slept under the starry sky, and learned to say goodbye to his amiguitos each time his migrant family moved on. When he grew up, he became a poet. This beautifully illustrated poem encourages children to imagine all that they might one day be.

Grandfather’s Journey by Allen Say

A Japanese-American man recounts his grandfather’s journey to America, which he later undertakes himself. He also describes the feeling of being torn by a love for two different countries. The immigrant experience has rarely been so poignantly evoked.

Dreamers by Yuyi Morales

In warm, sparkling prose that moves easily from English to Spanish and back, Caldecott Honor artist Morales traces the journey that she and her small son took in 1994, when they emigrated from Mexico to the United States. Many books about immigration describe the process of making new friends and fitting in; this one describes what it’s like to become a creative being in two languages, and to learn to love in both.

A Different Pond by Bao Phi

This beautiful tale about a father and son’s fishing trip in Minneapolis shows the interconnectedness of family. The story, told from the boy’s perspective, begins when his father wakes him before dawn. Although the child enjoys the outing as a special adventure, they are fishing for food, not sport. The quiet time together provides opportunities for the father to talk about his long-ago life in Vietnam.

Marwan’s Journey by Patricia de Arias

A child fleeing conflict walks across the desert, recalling the home he left behind and promising to return to it someday. As he walks, the simple and poetic text brings readers along on this heartbreaking journey: “I walk, and my footsteps leave a trace of ancient stories, the songs of my homeland, and the smell of tea and bread, jasmine and earth.”

The Journey by Francesca Sanna

What is it like to have to leave everything behind and travel many miles to somewhere unfamiliar and strange? In this beautiful, powerful book, a mother and her two children set out on such a journey – a journey filled with fear of the unknown, but also great hope for what lies ahead.

The Keeping Quilt by Patricia Polacco

The story recounts the author’s great-grandmother’s arrival in this country from Eastern Europe. Her dress and babushka become part of a quilt that is been handed down from generation to generation. This book is most notable for the family traditions and the changes that it describes, and for the intergenerational love it portrays.

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Afrofuturism is an art form that allows black people to see themselves in the future despite a sometimes distressing past and present. Through these science fiction and fantasy works, authors re-imagine the past and generate box-breaking black life in the future. We’ve put together a list of eleven titles featuring black characters living in fictional universes brimming with magic, technology, and time travel.

Zahrah the Windseeker by Nnedi Okorafor

A timid thirteen-year-old girl undertakes a dangerous quest into the Forbidden Greeny Jungle.

Parable of the Talents by Octavia Butler

Larkin describes the broken world of 2032, as war racks the North American continent and a religious crusader becomes president.

The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin

The sole continent of the earth is threatened by murder, betrayal, a super-volcano, and overlords who use the planet’s power as a weapon.

The War With the Mein by David Anthony Durham

The ruler of an idyllic empire hides the truth from his four children, until an assassin from the Mein, an exiled race, strikes him down and frees his children.

Children of Blood and Bone by Tomi Adeyemi

Zâelie and her family fight to restore magic to the land and activate a new generation of magi.

Brown Girl in the Ring by Nalo Hopkinson

After the rich abandon the city, those without money must adopt the old ways of farming, barter, and herb lore. Then the moneyed return seeking a harvest of bodies.

Bloodchild and Other Stories by Octavia Butler

This collection of short stories includes the novella, “Bloodchild,” a parable about the treatment of women throughout history.

Dhalgren by Samuel R. Delany

Journeying to Bellona, where only criminals and madmen remain, The Kid wonders at the strange portents that appear in the city’s cloud-covered sky.

47 by Walter Mosley

In 1832, a 14-year-old slave meets Tall John, who teaches him magical science and the meaning of freedom.

Binti by Nnedi Okorafor

The only one of her kind ever invited to study at Oomza Uni, the finest institution of higher learning in the galaxy, Binti uses her intellect to fight for herself and her people.

The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle

A con artist masquerading as a street musician meets a wealthy man intent upon opening a portal to another dimension.

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Nov 2 2018

All’s Well That Ends Welles!

by Scot L

When you think of Orson Welles, what comes to mind? Citizen Kane? The commercials for Paul Masson wine? His final screen performance, as the voice of Unicron in Transformers: The Movie? Although 46 productive years separate his celebrated screen debut in Kane (“Rosebud …”) and his final line (“Destiny … You cannot destroy my destiny …..”) as a cartoon robot, the time between is a dead zone to many. Yet those years were filled with memorable performances and directorial achievements that are all the more impressive for the financial and logistical challenges Welles faced in making them.

Today, Netflix begins streaming a recently completed version of The Other Side of the Wind, a project Welles worked on intermittently throughout the 1970s. Originally intended to be shot quickly, Welles almost immediately encountered a series of delays that would bring any other production to a permanent halt. Josh Karp relates this bizarre and inspiring story in Orson Welles’s Last Movie: The Making of The Other Side of the Wind. But what about Welles’s other movies? We’ve put together a list of 10 movies for your next Orson Welles Movie Marathon that will help you connect the dots between Charles Foster Kane and Unicron.

 

Citizen Kane (1941)

Welles’s film debut is perennially touted as the Best Movie Ever, but don’t let that stop you from watching it – it’s a blast. Welles stars as the enormously wealthy and magnificently unhappy Charles Foster Kane, whose dying word (“Rosebud”) prompts a journalist’s search for the meaning behind the word.

The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)

Based on Booth Tarkington’s novel, Welles’s second film chronicles the precipitous decline of a wealthy Midwestern family. Subjected to grotesque studio edits after completion, the movie is an example of mutilated greatness – and makes any viewer wonder what Welles’ unspoiled vision of the film would have been.

The Stranger (1946)

In Welles’s third directorial effort, Edgar G. Robinson plays a war crimes investigator on the trail of a fugitive Nazi war criminal (Welles) who has integrated himself into the life of a small New England town.

The Lady from Shanghai (1947)

Welles wrote, directed, and starred in this twisty tale of murder gone wrong. He plays a lusty sailor who finds himself drawn into the orbit of a disabled attorney and his wife (played by Welles’ then-wife, Rita Hayworth). Agreements to stage a murder are made; confessions are signed; actual murders are committed. The movie’s smashing climax – set in a mirror maze – more than adequately reflects the labyrinthine plot.

Macbeth (1948)

Shot in 23 days, this is Welles’s first cinematic adaptation of Shakespeare.

Othello  (1951)

Welles’s second adaptation of Shakespeare took a little longer – around three years – to complete. Shot in Morocco and Italy, Welles addressed the many logistical and financial problems he faced by pumping his own money into the production. The Criterion edition owned by the library contains the European and US versions of the film.

Mr. Arkadin (1955)

Criterion rewards the Welles fanatic again with its three-disc edition of this film. It’s the story of an American smuggler who is hired by a mysterious billionaire (Welles) who claims he cannot remember his past. The smuggler’s job? To investigate that past. The only problem is, the people he talks to begin ending up dead.

Touch of Evil (1958)

Thrilling, sleazy, and endlessly entertaining,  Welles’s next film opens in a Mexican border town. A bomb is planted on a car; the car drives across the border; the car goes boom. Welles – painfully bloated – stars as the corrupt police captain Hank Quinlan, while Charlton Heston portrays Mexican drug enforcement officer Miguel Vargas. (Chew on that for a bit.)

Chimes at Midnight (1965)

Regarded by some as the crowning achievement of Welles’s career, the film was originally released in 1967 and then forgotten about. Long available only in pirated editions, Criterion’s spiffy DVD release of Welles’s third full-length Shakespearean adaptation – it incorporates elements of both Henry IV plays, Richard II, Henry V, and The Merry Wives of Windsor – is marvelous and well worth the wait. Welles stars, in a heartbreaking turn, as Falstaff.

F Is For Fake (1975)

Welles’s last completed film was originally intended to be a documentary about the professional art forger Elmyr de Hory. It is that, and so much more – what that more is, we will leave as a surprise for you.

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