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Authors

Picking up where I left off yesterday, here are 10 of my favorite nonfiction reads from the last year. Click here for the entire list, or click on the individual covers and titles below to be taken to their records in our catalog.

Look Alive Out There by Sloane Crosley

Sloane Crosley is often referred to as the female David Sedaris, and all of these essays are top notch. The writing is a perfect mix of hilarious and heartfelt. Fans of Nora Ephron should absolutely read this collection.

She Caused a Riot: 100 Unknown Women Who Built Cities, Sparked Revolutions, and Massively Crushed It by Hannah Jewell

An empowering look into the epic adventures and dangerous exploits of 100 women. The entries are both funny and informational. You’ll learn something new on every page.

What If This Were Enough? by Heather Havrilesky

This essay collection from the writer of the popular “Ask Polly” advice column examines the contradictions of middle-class American life with insight, humor, and terrific prose.

Good and Mad: The Revolutionary Power of Women’s Anger by Rebecca Traister

An incisive exploration into the transformative power of female anger. Rebecca Traister does an incredible job taking this still unfolding history and turning it into a narrative.

Ghosts in the Schoolyard: Racism and School Closings in Chicago’s South Side by Eve Ewing

Eve Ewing knows Chicago schools. She was a student and teacher in them, and is now a scholar who studies them. This fascinating history of the Chicago Public School System is framed around the 2013 announcement of an unprecedented number of school closings.

Educated by Tara Westover

Tara Westover’s memoir of escape from her survivalist father is thrilling from start to finish. She didn’t set foot in a classroom until she was 17 and now holds several advanced degrees. This memoir is truly inspiring.

Tonight I’m Someone Else by Chelsea Hodson

From an American Apparel model to a NASA employee, Hodson takes us through her work experiences in essays that look at the ways people connect to their work and to each other.

I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer by Michelle McNamara

Published posthumously, this account of the author’s research into the Golden State Killer is riveting from start to finish. Since the publication of the book, the serial killer has been caught and confessed.

All You Can Ever Know by Nicole Chung

Nicole Chung looks back at her life as a transracial adoptee and wrestles with the fact that the prepackaged myth her adoptive parents told her may not be the whole truth. Chung’s writing is beautiful and the story of finding your identity is engaging from the first page to the last.

Dead Girls: Essays on Surviving an American Obsession by Alice Bolin

In these essays, Bolin shows how women’s bodies are used as props to boost the stories of men. She analyzes, novels, movies, stories, and television programs that are obsessed with disenfranchised women. She ends the stunning collection by examining the injustices that real women suffer because of the portrayal of women in media.

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While librarians don’t sit around and read all day at work, most of us are voracious readers when we’re not on the desk. Below are 10 of my favorite novels and short story collections published in 2018. Click here for the entire list, or click on the individual covers and titles below to be taken to their records in our catalog. Come back tomorrow for a look at my 10 favorite non-fiction reads of 2018.

The Incendiaries by R.O. Kwon

Inspired by the author’s own loss of faith at the age of 17, this thrilling debut about religious fervor on a college campus is told through a series of intense memories pieced together after a terrorist attack.

Heartbreaker by Claudia Dey

A missing mother. An isolated community. One of the best canine narrators in literature. Dey sets her novel in a secluded area of Canada, and the area becomes the emotional center of the book, which deals with both adolescence and motherhood.

Invitation to a Bonfire by Adrienne Celt

Loosely based on the adulterous marriage of Vladimir Nabokov, this novel is told in diary entries and follows the love triangle of Zoya, Vera, and Leo through the 1920s. The novel is filled with beautiful sentences worthy of Nabokov himself.

The Immortalists by Chloe Benjamin

If you knew the date of your death, how would you choose to live? This is the question at the heart of this novel, which follows the four Gold siblings throughout their lives and examines how they deal with the information given to them by a mystical woman on the Lower East Side of New York City in the summer of 1969.

Florida by Lauren Groff

This short story collection is entrancing from start to finish. Groff’s ability to write precise sentences leads to several unsettling (in a good way) stories where danger lurks at every turn.

An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

This compelling novel tells the story of love, justice, and loyalty as a couple is ripped apart when one is falsely accused of a crime.

The Wrong Heaven by Amy Bonnaffons

In this imaginative and unsettling debut short story collection, Bonnaffons creates worlds that are decidedly strange. Her writing is funny, insightful, and probing. A story in the collection about a woman trying to turn herself into a horse was also featured on a recent episode of This American Life.

The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai

1980s Chicago is the setting for this novel, which explores the AIDS crisis through the character of Yale Tishman, an art director who tries to finalize a deal for a collection of 1920s paintings as his whole world begins to crumble around him. This novel is beautiful from beginning to end. You’ll want to read it in one sitting.

Certain American States by Catherine Lacey

A story collection about characters trying to come to terms with their place in the world. Catherine Lacey’s tales of love, loss, and longing are hard to shake. The way she writes about characters trying to get a handle on their own lives is simply beautiful.

Circe by Madeline Miller

Miller expertly makes the story of Circe come to life in this astounding novel. After she is banished to a deserted island by Zeus, Circe hones her occult craft and comes into contact with several famous figures from mythology.

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Who doesn’t love a good stunt memoir? You know: Books in which an author recounts his or her decision to do (or not do) this or that thing and then document the results of said decision. As someone who regularly undertakes large personal projects that inevitably fall far short of completion, I relate and admire those individuals who decide to do a thing, then do that thing, and are then (finally!) possessed of the energy and organizational skills to relate their findings to the world. Anyway! We have assembled a list of 15 such titles for you to peruse. Click here for the entire list, or click on the title or cover of each suggested book to be taken to its record in our catalog.

So Many Books, So Little Time: A Year of Passionate Reading by Sara Nelson

Sara Nelson set out to chronicle a year’s worth of reading, to explore how the world of books and words intermingled with the “real” world. Fifty-two weeks, fifty-two books …  and it all fell apart the first week. That’s when she discovered that books chose her as much as she chose them, and the rewards and frustrations they brought were nothing she could plan for.

Three Among the Wolves: A Couple and Their Dog Live a Year With Wolves in the Wild by Helen Thayer

Helen and Bill Thayer, accompanied by their part-wolf, mostly Husky dog, Charlie, set out on foot to live among wild wolf packs, first in the Canadian Yukon and then in the Arctic. They discover the complexities of wolf family structure and view the intricacies of the hunt firsthand, as well as the wolves’ finely honed survival skills and engaging playfulness.

Julie and Julia: My Year of Cooking Dangerously by Julie Powell

This is the story of Julie Powell’s attempt to revitalize her marriage, restore her ambition, and save her soul by cooking all 524 recipes in volume one of Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking – in a mere 365 days.

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: A Year of Food Life by Barbara Kingsolver

In this book, Barbara Kingsolver and her family embark on a rural, locally sourced adventure. For one year, their diet will consist solely of  food that was raised in their own neighborhood or that they have grown themselves.

A Year Without “Made In China”: One Family’s True Life Adventure in the Global Economy by Sara Bongiorni

Sara Bongiorni fills this book with engaging stories and anecdotes of her family’s yearlong attempt to outrun China’s reach – by boycotting Chinese-made products – and does a remarkable job of taking a decidedly big-picture issue (the effects of globalism) and breaking it down to a personal level.

The Year of Living Biblically: One Man’s Humble Quest to Follow the Bible as Literally as Possible by A.J. Jacobs

The author of The Know-It-All follows up his bestselling account of reading the entire Encyclopedia Britannica with another improbable adventure – a year spent living, as literally as possible, by the rules of the Bible.

The Happiness Project: Or Why I Spent a Year Trying to Sing in the Morning, Clean My Closets, Fight Right, Read Aristotle, and Generally Have More Fun by Gretchen Rubin

In the vein of Julie and Julia, this book describes Gretchen Rubin’s year-long attempt to discover what leads to true contentment. Drawing at once on cutting-edge science, classical philosophy, and real-world applicability, Rubin has written an engaging chronicle of personal transformation.

Working in the Shadows: A Year of Doing the Jobs (Most) Americans Won’t Do by Gabriel Thompson

What is it like to do the back-breaking work of immigrants? To find out, Gabriel Thompson spent a year working alongside Latino immigrants, who initially thought he was either crazy or an undercover immigration agent. Thompson shines a bright light on the underside of the American economy, exposing harsh working conditions, union busting, and lax government enforcement – while telling the stories of workers, undocumented immigrants, and desperate U.S. citizens forced to live with chronic pain in the pursuit of $8 an hour.

My Year With Eleanor: A Memoir by Noelle Hancock

In this book, Noelle Hancock recounts the results of her decision to heed the advice of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt and do one thing a day that scares her in the year before her 30th birthday.

MWF Seeking BFF: My Yearlong Search for a New Best Friend by Rachel Bertsche

Newly arrived in Chicago and friendless, author Rachel Bertsche  settles upon a plan: She’ll go on 52 friend-dates, one per week for a year, in hopes of meeting her new Best Friend Forever.

Our Black Year: One Family’s Quest to Buy Black in America’s Racially Divided Economy by Maggie Anderson

On January 1, 2009, Maggie and John Anderson embarked on a year-long public pledge to “buy black.” The Andersons combed Chicago in search of supermarkets, dry cleaners, gas stations, pharmacies, and clothing stores owned by African-Americans, and this is the story of what they learned.

Mirror, Mirror Off the Wall: How I Learned to Love My Body By Not Looking At It for a Year Kjerstin Gruys

When Kjerstin Gruys became engaged, she was thrilled – until it came time to shop for a wedding dress. Faced with a new set of impossible beauty standards, she found herself struggling to maintain a positive self-image. She then decided to embark on a bold plan, vowing to give up mirrors and other reflective surfaces, relying instead on her friends to help her gauge her appearance and her outlook on life.

Cork Dork: A Wine-Fueled Adventure Among the Obsessive Sommeliers, Big Bottle Hunters, and Rogue Scientists Who Taught Me to Live for Taste by Bianka Bosker

In this book, Bianka Bosker quits her job as an executive in the tech industry and gives herself one year to become a master sommelier. Her quest takes her inside underground tasting groups, exclusive New York City restaurants, California mass-market wine factories, and even a neuroscientist’s fMRI machine as she attempts to answer the most nagging question of all: what’s the big deal about wine?

All Day: A Year of Love and Survival Teaching Incarcerated Kids at Rikers Island by Liza Jessie Peterson

This book recounts a year in poet and actress Liza Jessie Peterson’s classroom at Island Academy, the high school for inmates detained at New York City’s Rikers Island.

The Year of Less by Cait Flanders

This book documents the twelve months during which author Cait Flanders bought only consumables: groceries, toiletries, fuel for her car. She trashed 70 percent of her belongings, learned how to fix things rather than throw them away, researched the zero waste movement, and completed a television ban – learning at every stage that the less she consumed, the more fulfilled she felt.

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The baseball season allows fans of the game to keep one foot planted in summer. The only problem is, once the final pitch of the World Series is thrown, they are suddenly cast out of that hot, sunny season and left standing at the threshold of winter. Looking for a way to prolong the season’s afterglow just a bit longer? We’ve assembled a list of 16 books to help you better enjoy the postseason.

The Big Bam: The Life and Times of Babe Ruth by Leigh Montville

Babe Ruth was the biggest performer on the biggest stage of his time. Montville explores the facts, as well as the myths and legends, of the man some claim saved baseball after the Black Sox Scandal.
 
 
 

The Soul of Baseball: A Road Trip Through Buck O’Neil’s America by Joe Posnanski

Buck O’Neil, the breakout star of Ken Burn’s famous baseball documentary, was a friend and teammate of Satchel Paige, as well as a historian and advocate of the game. He and Posnanski traveled America in search of his baseball history.
 
 
 

In the Time of Bobby Cox: The Atlanta Braves, Their Manager, My Couch, Two Decades, and Me by Lang Whitaker

A devoted fan’s perspective on the Braves’ long run of championships and heartbreak.
 
 
 
 

Rickey And Robinson: The True, Untold Story About The Integration Of Baseball by Roger Kahn

Any Roger Kahn baseball book deserves attention. In this work, Kahn delves into the efforts of Branch Rickey and Jackie Robinson to integrate major league baseball.
 
 
 

Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty by Charles Leerhsen

A more nuanced portrayal than once could be found of the first great Georgia-born baseball player.
 
 
 
 
 

Moneyball by Michael Lewis

The story of the 2003 Oakland A’s, whose groundbreaking front-office practices took the team to the postseason despite a limited payroll. Brad Pitt played the lead in the movie.
 
 
 
 

Luckiest Man: The Life and Death of Lou Gehrig by Jonathan Eig

Eig’s book is an in-depth look at the quiet superstar who resided in Babe Ruth’s shadow for most of his career.
 
 
 
 

Baseball: A History of America’s Favorite Game by George Vecsey

A solid, one-volume history of the game. The Louisville Courier Journal said “This book is an instant classic – a highly readable guide to America’s great enduring pastime.”
 
 
 
 

Only the Ball Was White: A History of Legendary Players and All-Black Professional Teams by Robert Peterson

A powerful account of the history of the Negro Leagues and the conditions under which the games were played.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Click here for the rest of the list and you’ll be taken into our catalog, where you can view (and request!) one (or more!) of these books.

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Reese Witherspoon  (RW) loves to read!  She has her own production company that recently put together the Emmy nominated Big Little Lies series on HBO.  Big Little Lies was based on Liane Moriarty’s very successful book by the same title.  Many of her picks have ended up oThe Alice Networkn the big screen.  She recently starred in A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L’Engle which will be out next year some time.  Reese Witherspoon has many connections to the literary world.

Her RW book club selection for July was The Alice Network by Kate Quinn.  I don’t know if it will end up on the big screen like some of her other projects.  One can hope!  There was a poll for her readers and The Alice Network was picked.

I recently read this book. The Alice Network tells the story of Eve Gardiner and Charlie St. Clair.  Each has a very important mission.  Charlie goes to Eve for help finding her cousin Rose Fournier.  Rose’s last known location was Limoges, France.  She worked at a restaurant for a character named Rene Bordelon.  Eve and Charlie journey to France with Eve’s driver Finn.  They start looking for answers to what might have happened to Rose.  Questions arise as you read such as, What will happen when Charlie finds her? Will it be a happy reunion or a chance to mourn an important loss?  Charlie’s clues help Eve find what she has been looking for since the First World War. Eve worked as a spy in Rene’s restaurant Le Lethe in Lille, France.   What does the future hold for both of them?

I enjoyed this book.  What interested me initially is the story of Eve becoming a spy during World War I.  I was not as interested in Charlie’s history until her path and Eve’s intertwined.  Kate Quinn also did a great job of showing the historical facts of that time period.

There is a lot to discuss in The Alice Network.  What will your next book club read be?  Reese’s next selection for the RW book club in August is The Lying Game by Ruth Ware.  You can follow the RW bookclub here.

Visit the catalog for :

The Alice Network  by Kate Quinn

Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

A Wrinkle In Time by Madeline L’Engle

The Lying Game  by Ruth Ware

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Mar 30 2017

The Eternal Jane

by Dea Anne M

“No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy would have supposed her born to be a heroine.”northanger

Upon reading this sentence, the first in Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey, during my second year of college – I was hooked and from that moment forward I joined the legions of passionate Jane Austen fans. “Janeite” is a term coined and taken up during the late nineteenth century by a group of male literary critics and publishers and the label carried a clubby sort of aura. It denoted a privately held enthusiasm, almost on the order of a guilty pleasure, sort of how some people nurture a secret fondness for mayo and peanut butter sandwiches or for playing the lute. Now, “Janeite” often carries mansfielda pejorative meaning (though not always) for those who move in the rarefied academic world and tends to refer to people who indulge in the campier side of Jane Austen fandom such as costuming and reenactment events. Me? I just love the books. From the popular, much beloved and often filmed Pride and Prejudice to the undeniably problematic Mansfield Park – I can’t get enough Austen. I admit that I’ve yet to read Lady Susan – an early work of Austen’s which has been adapted for the screen by Whit Stillman as Love and Friendship (see it – it’s fun!) – but I look forward to doing so soon.

Make no mistake, I’m not one of those readers who swoon over Mr. Darcy (although there’s nothing wrong with it if you are!). My appreciation for Austen is tied up more with her consistently acute observation of what was, admittedly, a fairly narrow slice of the world and with her ironic sense of humor. Indeed, I’ve read most of Austen’s novels more than once and never fail to find them newly entertaining. I also remain fascinated with the offshoots and culture that have grown up around Jane Austen’s life and work. From the weird (but kind of wonderful) to the knitsearnestly correct there appears to be something for everyone in Austenland (which, incidentally, is the title of a 2013 feature film based on a Shannon Hale’s 2007 novel). I encourage you to explore and find your own cozy niche. Are you into needlework? Don’t miss The Best of Jane Austen Knits: 27 regency-inspired designs. Do you fancy a stirring love story mixed in with your epic struggle against the undead?  Be sure to check out Pride and Prejudice and Zombies: the classic Regency romance – now with ultraviolent zombie mayhem.

Of course, apart from Austen’s own novels, there’s a plethora of fiction inspired by it. Here’s a very abbreviated list.

Longbourn by Jo Baker (Pride and Prejudice told from the household servants point of view)

longbornEmma: a modern retelling by Alexander McCall Smith ( from the creator of the wonderful Mma Precious Ramotswe series)

Confessions of a Jane Austen Addict: a novel by Laurie Viera Rigler (A modern woman’s time travel leads to amusing complication…and culture shock!)

Jane and the Unpleasantness at Scargrave Manor by Stephanie Barron (the first in a mystery series featuring Jane Austen as sleuth)

Prom and Prejudice by Elizabeth Eulberg (an engaging YA romp set at an exclusive girl’s academy)

The works of Jane Austen have also inspired a host of non-fiction books. Here’s a few that provide an unusual approach to the material.

A Jane Austen Education: how six novels taught me about love, friendship and the things that really matter by educationWilliam Deresiewicz

The Jane Austen Handbook: a sensible yet elegant guide to her world by Margaret C. Sullivan

At Home With Jane Austen by Kim Wilson

Jane Austen Rules: a classic guide to modern love by Sinead Murphy

Do you like Jane Austen? What’s your favorite of her novels? If you’ve never read her books and want to see what they’re all about, I would recommend starting with Pride and Prejudice – to my mind still her best – although I can’t help putting in a plug for my first Austen crush, Northanger Abbey. It’s one of her shorter novels, and most important, it’s very, very funny. Enjoy!

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How many of you check magazines and newspapers for the next best read?   Such as Red Book, Real Simple, Glamour, or USA Today?  These lists usually comprise what is currently the hottest books in the market.  I myself usually find these lists interesting to see what the selections are and which authors areThe Sun Is Also the Star included.

A website or blog has recently joined these hot magazines in offering the hottest books.  This site is Pop Sugar.  The posts are written by author Brenda Janowitz.  We currently have her latest book  The Dinner Party.  I thought it would be fun to see what titles DCPL has that were recently noted on her 50 Books of 2016 list.

So here are some titles from the best of 2016 that you can find at DCPL:

THE SUN IS ALSO THE STAR by Nicola Yoon

THE TRESPASSER by Tanya French

Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult

Every Song Ever:  twenty ways to listen in an age of  musical plenty  by Ben Ratliff

Sons and Daughters of Ease and PlentySons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty by Ramona Ausubel

The Lonely City: adventures in the art of being alone by Olivia Liang

Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeliene Thien

My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout

Moon Glow by Michael Chabon

Known and Strange Things by Teju Cole

Imagine Me Gone by Adam Haslett

13 Ways of Looking at a Fat Girl by Mona Awad

YOU WILL KNOW ME by Megan Abbott

And more…

Many of these books are available in audiobook format, ebook, and downloadable audio.  If you are looking for reader advisory then visit Pop Sugar for the 2017 list.  Happy Reading!

 

 

 

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Dec 7 2016

Meet Anita Hughes!

by Jencey G

I have had the opportunity to get to know Anita Hughes through her bookshughes-1135 and my personal blog Writer’s Corner.  She is debuting with us at DeKalb County Public Library with her book Christmas in Paris.  Anita is stopping by so that our readers here could have an opportunity to get to know this great author.

So Anita what are five interesting facts that readers should know about you?

I was born and raised in Sydney, Australia.

I live on the beach in Dana Point, California, and love to walk along the ocean.

I have five children! And still find time to write.

I am a huge frozen yogurt fan and have it every night for dessert.

I love 19th century British literature: Thomas Hardy, D.H. Lawrence, George Eliot, Wilkie Collins.”

 

christmas-in-paris_final-cover-1Since this book is set at Christmas time what is your favorite aspect of Christmas?

My favorite thing about Christmas is that the whole family is together. The children are now old enough to buy each other presents, so it is a very festive time and everyone really enjoys it. We usually spend three full days together and walk on the beach and cook and have ping pong tournaments.”

One aspect of your writing I love is how you have your heroine set in a high position in both her career and family background. This aspect reminds me of authors such as Judith Krantz and Barbara Taylor Bradford.  How have these ladies influenced your writing?

Yes! I have read everything by Judith Krantz and many books by Barbara Taylor Bradford. I am the biggest fan of Krantz’s books and Princess Daisy and Mistral’s Daughter really influenced my writing. I have always been a huge reader and devoured all the big, glossy, blockbusters.

Do you plan to continue to use exotic locations for your settings of your future stories?

Yes, my next book, White Sand, Blue Sea, is set in St. Bart’s and comes out in April. Emerald Coast, set in Sardinia, comes out next August and there will be a Christmas book set in a gorgeous location next year too.”

Has your childhood played a part in where your stories are set?

My parents were European and as a child we traveled a lot. I also grew up with a large world view, living in Australia and being exposed to different cultures. I use a lot of the places I fell in love with as a child – Lake Como, Cannes, Rome, Paris, in my books.

How much experience do you have using libraries in the various places you live?

I adore libraries. When my children were small, we were in the library almost every afternoon. I would park them in the children’s section and read everything in the fiction section. I love our local library in Dana Point, which is a block from my house.”

What is your favorite activity to do in the library?

I like to read the first couple of pages of a dozen different fiction books. There are so many authors I am interested in, but don’t get the time to read.

Why is self-discovery so important in your novels?

As a wife and mother, I know women don’t get a lot of time for introspection. But it is important to take care of oneself at every stage in life. So I think self-discovery is very important for growth and self esteem.

Do all your novels start with the character in their lowest position to rise by the end of the novel?

I hadn’t really thought about it that way. I think they all start with the character having a dilemma. And usually in solving the dilemma, she discovers her best self along the way.

Thank you, Anita Hughes, for joining us today.  I am a fan of Anita’s work and cannot wait to see more of her books at DeKalb County Public Library.  Please check out Christmas in Paris.   If you like Anita then you might also be interested in: Elin Hilderbrand, Fannie Flagg, and JoJo Moyes.

Thank you so much for the support, Jencey! And I hope your readers enjoy my books.

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Oct 24 2016

Sister Dear by Laura McNeill

by Jencey G

How many of you remember Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn?  You probably either read the book or saw the movie.  Sister Dear has a similar feel to it.  This story is about two sisters, Allie and Emma.  sister-dearAllie is in prison for a crime she did not commit.  At the beginning of the story we meet Allie as she is departing from prison.  She has one goal and that is to prove her innocence.  The only consistent visitor she had during her time in prison was her sister Emma.  Allie’s young daughter Caroline only came and visited once or twice.  Emma told her sister that visiting made Caroline upset. Or did it really?  Is there a future for Allie in Brunswick Georgia?

The story is told from alternating points of view.  We hear from Allie, Emma, the sheriff, Caroline, and another character, Natalie the vet.  Emma and the sheriff are hiding a secret about what really happened.

The author slowly introduces the antagonist of the story which may catch readers by surprise.  Readers will want to skip to the end to find out if Allie is able to prove her innocence? Who really committed the murder?

The theme of the story is forgiveness and being able to move on from the past.  Can we let that go or be forever prisoned by these events?

This story really resonated with me.  I have a younger sister, so I was totally able to identify with the relationship between these sisters.  This book is one of the best that I have read this year! What is even more exciting is the author, Laura McNeill, will be at the Clarkston Library to discuss the book on Saturday, November 19th at 2:00 pm.I hope that you can join us for the discussion. Click here for information.

Please visit the catalog for a copy or drop by the Clarkston branch.

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JulieI have the book for you!  The book is Juliet by Anne Fortier, and is available to check out as a physical book.  It is also available in  downloadable audio in Overdrive.   The author Anne Fortier explores the real story behind Romeo and Juliet.   I have always said there is a little truth in all fiction.  This book also includes the genres of Fiction, Romance, Mystery, and Historical.

Julie and Janice Jacobs are coming home for the funeral of their recently deceased Aunt Rose.  Each women hopes to gain something from her estate.  Julie just wants a little money to cover her expenses and a place to live.  Janice just wants money.  Instead Janice is left with the house and all of its possessions.  Julie receives a mysterious key.  This key is linked to her past.  She is sent to Italy in hopes of finding treasure.  The first people she meets initially are Anna Maria Salenbini and her god son Lisandro on her way to Siena.   The first task is to go to the bank where her mother’s safety deposit box is located.   It includes the real story of Romeo and Juliet and the explanation of a curse on her family the Tolemaes and the Salenbinis.  Julie takes up the role of the modern Juliet.  Her given name from birth is Guiletta Tolemae.  But where is Romeo?  Why does Janice then make an appearance as well in Italy?  Is there really a treasure?

I loved this book!  Cassandra Campbell narrates the tale alternating between English and Italian accents.  She does an excellent job!  The story has many plot twists that will keep the reader guessing till the very end.   It had a slow start but became more interesting as the story evolved.  The reader will be left with a desire to meet their Romeo!

Please visit Overdrive for downloadable audiobook or the Catalog.  For  those of you who would like to read about the real story of  Romeo and Juliet read Understanding Romeo and Juliet by Thomas Thrasher.  See Romeo and Juliet a Duke Classic.

 

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