DCPLive is a blog by library staff at the DeKalb County Public Library!

newbery award

YouthMediaAwardsThe moment we’ve all been waiting for has come! Well, maybe we haven’t all been waiting for this, but if you are a children’s librarian or into children’s books, the American Library Association’s annual announcement of the best books and audiobooks in children’s and teen literature is pretty exciting stuff. So let’s get to it! DCPL Youth Services Librarians and staff recently had its own Mock Caldecott election, for which we chose Extra Yarn illustrated by Jon Klassen, so I was highly anticipating these results. The Caldecott is given to the illustrator with the most notable children’s picture book and this year marks the 75th anniversary of the award.

And the 2013 Caldecott Award goes to:

This Is Not My Hat illustrated and written by Jon Klassen

hat

The honor books are:

Creepy Carrots! illustrated by Peter Brown, written by Aaron Reynolds

carrtos

Extra Yarn illustrated by Jon Klassen, written by Mac Barnett

extra yarn

Green illustrated and written by Laura Vaccaro Seeger

green

One Cool Friend illustrated by David Small, written by Toni Buzzeo

friend

Sleep Like a Tiger illustrated by Pamela Zagarenski, written by Mary Logue

sleep

Love these choices! I’m not too surprised with these winners and am thrilled that a few of my personal favorites were chosen, including, of course, Extra Yarn, illustrated by Jon Klassen. He cleaned up this year by taking home an honor award and the top prize for This Is Not My Hat.  A follow up to his 2011 picture book, I Want My Hat Back, This Is Not My Hat is a must-read not just for its beautiful illustrations but for the very humorous storytelling with an ending that leaves readers a lot to ponder. You can check out some of his charming illustrations at http://jonklassen.tumblr.com/

I also loved that Creepy Carrots was chosen. With a description like this (from Simon and Schuster) how could it not be award winning? :

The Twilight Zone comes to the carrot patch in this clever picture book parable about a rabbit who fears his favorite treats are out to get him.

It’s funny and witty, and of course, creepy and makes for a great read-aloud!

What do you think of the Caldecott committee’s choices this year? Are there any books that you felt were more deserving?

The Newbery Award is given to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children and this year’s award went to Katherine Applegate’s The One and Only Ivan.

ivan

And the Newbery Honor Books are (click on the picture to take you to the catalog listing):

splendorsbombthree

 

 

 

The Caldecott and Newbery are the highest of the awards but there are many other notable awards including the Coretta Scott King Award, Printz, Belpré and more. For a full list of winners, click here.

{ 2 comments }

Jan 21 2013

DCPL Mock Caldecott Winners

by Nancy M

untitledThis past year, DeKalb County Public Library Youth Services Librarians and staff have been reading, reviewing and voting on picture book titles leading up to our first ever Mock Caldecott election. The Caldecott Medal is a prestigious children’s award that has been given out since 1938 to the illustrator with the most distinguished picture book. Recently, we all came together for our final vote and here are the results:

The 2013 DCPL Mock Caldecott Medal goes to…

extra yarnExtra Yarn illustrated by Jon Klassen and written by Mac Barnett

 

 

Our Honor Books are:

bootandshoeBoot and Shoe written and illustrated by Marla Frazee

 

 

indexChloe written and illustrated by Peter McCarty

 

 

indexCindy Moo illustrated by Jeff Mack and written by Lori Mortensen

 

 

indexBear Has a Story to Tell illustrated by Erin Stead and written by Philip C. Stead

 

It was a tight election and there were many beautiful picture books to choose from in 2012. This was our third and final vote and you can check out our past finalists here. Here are some more picture books that did not make our final vote but are definitely worth a read. Click on the title to be taken to the DCPL catalog.

indexunspokengainhawaiififtybites

 

 

 

homequietnightsongdragonhomer

 

 

 

The real Caldecott Medal will be awarded on Monday, January 28 along with many other American Library Association children’s and young adult book awards including the Newbery Medal and the Coretta Scott King Book Award. You can view the winners here and check back to DCPLive that week for a listing and to share your thoughts.

{ 2 comments }

imagesThis past Monday the American Library Association announced the year’s best in children’s books and media. This much anticipated event includes a couple of the most well-known and prestigious awards- The Newbery and Caldecott Medals. The Newbery Medal is awarded to the author with the most outstanding contribution to American literature for children and has been awarded since 1922. The Caldecott Medal, awarded since 1937, is given to the artist with the most distinguished American children’s picture book.

And so, without further ado, the winner of this year’s Newbery Medal is:

Stead When You Reach Me by Rebecca Stead

And the winner of the Caldecott Medal is:

lion The Lion and the Mouse by Jerry Pinkney

For a complete list of youth awards given this year, check out the American Library Association’s website.

{ 0 comments }

Sep 18 2009

Neil Gaiman’s Bookshelves

by Jesse M

dcpl-blog-image-neil-gaimanWhatever your taste in books, if you’ve spent much time in a library or bookstore over the past 20 years it’s likely you’ve at least heard of Neil Gaiman. A successful author in a variety of different genres (including science fiction, fantasy, and horror, as well as graphic novels, books for children, and screenplays for television and film), he has been the recipient of numerous awards, most notably the Nebula, Bram Stoker, and World Fantasy Awards, as well as the 2009 Newbery Medal for The Graveyard Book (which also won the Hugo for best book and Locus award for best YA novel). He is listed in the Dictionary of Literary Biography as one of the top ten living post-modern writers, and two of his books (Stardust and Coraline) have been adapted into major motion pictures (we carry both adaptations in the DCPL catalog, and they can be located here, and here, respectively).

The website Shelfari (a literary oriented social networking site which allows members to build a virtual bookshelf to display books they’ve read) recently posted an article on Neil Gaiman and his personal library. The idea was, as stated by the author of the piece, “you can learn a lot about someone by seeing what’s on his or her bookshelf…[so] we thought it would be fun to take a look at what’s on the bookshelves of some of our favorite authors.”

Mr. Gaiman’s home library is impressive, both in terms of quantity and quality. A perusal of his bookshelves reveals a man with an eclectic and varied taste, exactly what one would expect from such a talented and wide-ranging author.

If you are interested in learning more about Neil Gaiman, his website offers a wealth of information about his life, work, and current activities. You can also check out his author profile on Shelfari or follow him on Twitter. And for those who have never read anything by him but are looking for a good place to start, allow me to recommend a couple of my favorites:

dcpl-blog-image-sandman-thumbnailThe Sandman graphic novel series is, in a word, brilliant. It has been critically acclaimed, being one of very few comics to ever make it onto the NY Times bestseller list as well as have been selected as one of Entertainment Weekly’s “100 best reads from 1983 to 2008“.  Although DCPL doesn’t carry the entire series, we do carry the first collection of issues I read, entitled The Doll’s House, which is a fine place to start exploring the series, as well as its  follow up installments: Dream Country and Season of Mists.

dcpl-blog-image-american-gods-thumbnailAmerican Gods was awarded the Hugo and Nebula awards (among others) and tells the story of Shadow, an ex-con who learns upon his release from prison that both his wife and best friend died the previous day in a car accident, leaving him with no one to come home to. Offered a job as a bodyguard by a mysterious man named Wednesday, Shadow travels with him around the country, slowly learning of a weird and dangerous world he never knew existed, and the Gods, old and new, that inhabit it.

Check them both out. You won’t be disappointed.

{ 1 comment }

On Monday, the American Library Association gave the John Newbery Award for the most distinguished contribution to children’s literature to Neil Gaiman for The Graveyard Book.

I was pleasantly surprised by this year’s choice because the Newbery doesn’t often go to fantasies and because of the frequent tendency for Newbery books to be ‘good’ books, as in good-for-you. Even Mr. Gaiman seemed surprised, saying that “there are books that are best sellers and books that are winners.” Popularity is not a consideration for the Newbery award (and rightly so), but there’s been a lot of debate in the library world recently about the obscurity of the most recent winners.

As a child I resisted reading ‘good’ books, preferring escapism to character-building.  As an adult, I know that I missed out on some excellent stories the child-me would have loved. As a librarian,  I’m trying to get those excellent stories to children who are just as reluctant as I was to read a ‘good’ book.  So I’m happy that this year’s Newbery choice means the good and the popular are on the same page.

I always love looking at the Caldecott books and this year the award for the most distinguished picture book for children goes to The House in the Night, illustrated by Beth Krommes and written by Susan Marie Swanson.

The ALA makes lots of other awards as well, including the Odyssey Award for audiobooks.  One of this year’s Odyssey Honor nominees is Martina the Beautiful Cockroach: A Cuban Folktale, written and narrated by local author and DCPL favorite Carmen Agra Deedy. Congratulations to Ms. Deedy, Mr. Gaiman, Ms. Krommes and all the other winners and nominees!

{ 2 comments }