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running

Mar 24 2014

Athlete Wannabe

by Hope L

Born to RunI have never been able to run.

Sashay …  sort of.  Jog …  maybe.  Slog  …  definitely!   But,  RUN?  …   fogettaboutit!

Unless you count running to the bathroom during a really good movie or running across the street on a freezing-cold, wind-whipping day.  Then, I can and will RUN.

But, with the Olympics on television recently, I would still like to think of myself as an ‘athlete.’

Now, I have known people who have run 3 + miles (5k) and 6+ miles (10k), and I  hear there are people who can run 26 miles and change (in one outing!!!) in what we commonly call a ‘marathon,’  but I had never heard of a human running 50 or 100 miles (or more!!) in a single event.

But wait!  I had  heard of this before, a few years back on the television program “Live with Regis and Kelly,”  Regis was joshing with Dean Karnazes, an “ultramarathon” runner, via Skype.  (An ultramarathon is any sporting event involving running and walking longer than the traditional marathon length of 42.195 kilometers: those that cover a specified distance, and events that take place during a specified time span.)

Phew!  My shin splints hurt just thinking about it!

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Sep 16 2013

Inspirations for a healthier life

by Jesse M

Reading Glenda’s post from last month about losing weight got me thinking about books I’ve read over the years that have inspired me to alter my diet or exercise habits. These are not diet or exercise books though. Rather, these books inspire lifestyle changes by providing information that challenges the reader to think about their everyday behaviors in a different way.

Stuffed and starved coverStuffed and starved: markets, power, and the hidden battle for the world’s food system by Raj Patel

In this eye-opening book, author Raj Patel takes readers on a journey through the global food system, demonstrating how both the problems of malnourishment and obesity are both symptomatic of the worldwide corporate food monopoly. Well sourced and argued, this book may make you think twice about alternatives when considering your next trip to the supermarket.

Born to run coverBorn to run: a hidden tribe, superathletes, and the greatest race the world has never seen by Christopher McDougall

An epic adventure that began with one simple question: Why does my foot hurt? Part investigation of the biomechanics of running, part examination of ultra-marathons and their enthusiasts, McDougall takes readers into Mexico’s Copper Canyons to meet and learn from the Tarahumara Indians, who have honed the ability to run hundreds of miles without rest or injury utilizing only the simplest footwear. By the end of this book you’ll want to get up and go for a run yourself.

Hungry Planet coverHungry planet: what the world eats by Faith D’Aluisio

This award-winning book profiles 30 families from around the world and offers detailed descriptions of weekly food purchases; photographs of the families at home, at market, and in their communities; and a portrait of each family surrounded by a week’s worth of groceries. The photography is the real star of this book, especially the images of each family with one week of food. The disparity from country to country (and in some cases, across different regions of the same country) is often startling, and may cause readers to take a closer look at how much they themselves are consuming.

Stumbling on happiness coverStumbling on happiness by Daniel Gilbert

Written for a lay audience by Harvard psychology professor Daniel Gilbert, the central thesis of this book is that, through perception and cognitive biases, people imagine the future poorly, in particular what will make them happy. Gilbert discusses these issues and suggests ways that we can more accurately predict our future feelings and motivations. A major takeaway for me from this book was that if I wasn’t feeling motivated to do something now, it isn’t likely I’ll be miraculously more motivated later. This applies to all sorts of things in my life I have a tendency to procrastinate on, such as exercising, doing laundry, or starting a diet.

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There is still time to register for the Literacy Alliance of Metro Atlanta’s 5K Run/Walk for Literacy! The Literacy Alliance of Metropolitan Atlanta (LAMA) is a practical and innovative coalition that seeks to achieve 100% literacy among metro Atlanta’s adults and families. The 5K Run/Walk for literacy is an excellent way to get fit and promote literacy at the same time. Don’t miss out on this family-friendly event with prize giveaways! 100% of the proceeds support literacy programming and initiatives throughout Metro Atlanta.

To register, follow this link. Please select “DeKalb County Public Library Foundation” as the organization to benefit from your registration.

Online registration is $20 for individuals or $60 for a group (up to 4 individuals); day of registration is $25 for individuals and $70 for a group.

Online registration closes on Friday, September 28 at 6:49 PM. The race starts in Decatur Square on Saturday, September 29 at 8:00 AM.

For more information on the Literacy Alliance of Metro Atlanta, please click here.

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Mar 2 2012

The Zombies are coming!

by Amanda L

Did you know that there is a 5K obstacle course that is coming to Georgia? Instead of running against time you are running to avoid the zombies.  The Run for your Lives event is this weekend in Union Point, Georgia where the zombies will be chasing the participants. This event has been traveling the United States.

Want to know more about Zombies? Check out a Zombie’s history of the United States: from massacre at Plymoth Rock to the CIA’s secret war on the undead by Worm Miller. You might also be interested in Tracking the man-beasts: Sasquatch, vampires, zombies and more by Joe Nickell. Trying to avoid those zombies? You might try, The Zombie handbook by Robert Curran

Zombies have been hot over the last few years in the fiction arena. Here are a few titles you might want to explore if you like zombies:

Zombie, Ohio: a tale of the undead by Scott Kenemore

No one is safe in a zombie apocalypse… not even a zombie. With society decomposing before his eyes, and violence escalating into daily life, Peter, a rural Ohio college professor, finds his old friends are loath to associate with him. When he finds out that the automobile wreck that killed him wasn’t an accident, Peter resolves to solve his own murder.

The New Dead: a zombie anthology 

RESURRECTION! The hungry dead have risen. They shamble down the street. They hide in back yards, car lots, shopping malls. They devour neighbors, dogs and police officers. And they are here to stay. The real question is, what are you going to do about it? How will you survive? HOW WILL THE WORLD CHANGE WHEN THE DEAD BEGIN TO RISE? Stoker-award-winning author Christopher Golden has assembled an original anthology of never-before-published zombie stories from an eclectic array of today’s hottest writers.

Rot and Ruin by Jonathan Maberry

In a post-apocalyptic world where fences and border patrols guard the few people left from the zombies that have overtaken civilization, fifteen-year-old Benny Imura is finally convinced that he must follow in his older brother’s footsteps and become a bounty hunter.

Raising Stony Mayhall by Daryl Gregory

After a zombie attack, Wanda Mayhall rescues a near-dead infant on the side of a frozen Iowa highway and decides to raise him without telling the authorities, but as the boy gets older he realizes that there are other living dead in the world like him.

This is just a sampling. If you like zombie literature, what would you recommend that you have checked out at the library?

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Sep 15 2011

Help Literacy, and Get Fit Doing It

by Laura H

Participating in the upcoming Literacy Alliance of Metropolitan Atlanta’s 5K Run or Walk in Decatur at 8 AM on Saturday, September 24 is a no brainer for many reasons. First, you can select DeKalb County Public Library as your choice to receive 70% of the $20 registration fee—a real boon for us in this year of dramatically cut county budgets.  Also, you can get some exercise with your family or friends—either running or walking all or part of the 5k route through downtown Decatur. Most importantly, you’ll help raise awareness and promote interest in the wide spectrum of literacy needs in our communities. If you won’t be in town or available at that time, you can register as a “phantom” walker to lend needed support.

What else can you do?

  • Talk up this event with everyone and be sure to tell them to check DCPL on their registration to receive the incentive funds—otherwise, we won’t!
  • Register now on-line at www.literacyallianceatlanta.org—cost goes up after the 22nd.
  • Use this opportunity to let those you care about know you are interested in supporting the literacy needs of our community—especially those of adults and families. This media moment gives us a chance to highlight the fact that work readiness and GED completion is even more critical in this economy.

If you have questions please call Literacy Services at 404.370.8450 ext. 2240.

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Nov 18 2009

Running Back to The Basics

by Jnai W

It’s hard to believe that in about a month and a half, the year 2009 and the first decade of the New Millennium will be over. The passing decade–and this passing year–have been trying times that have tested many of us in faith and resolve. But for me, at least, it’s been an opportunity to get back to basics and be more creative about things.  Instead of eating out as much, I bring my lunch to work. Instead of going to the movies or paying for Netflix, I borrow DVDs from the Library (…and there’s the pitch).  In a way, as cheesy as it sounds, the economic downturn has helped me get back in touch with the simpler (and less expensive) pleasures of life.

Among the simpler pleasures I’ve been rediscovering is my passion for running, something I’ve enjoyed since I was a high school student. I can’t say that I was the speed demon of the team but I truly enjoyed the freedom of being out in the elements, among my fellow teammates and decked in the school colors off to a cross country meet.  Running taught me a great deal about endurance, discipline and was a great way to relieve stress and tension. Unfortunately, running fell by the wayside as I grew older and a bit more preoccupied.

For now, I’m getting back into the sport slowly but surely, as I haven’t been a serious runner for some time. Thus far, I walk at least twice a week and have been trying to work the jogging back in. It feels really good to rediscover a long lost love. Here’s a couple of books I’ve been checking out:

Running For Dummies by Florence Griffith-Joyner & John Hanc–My heart leaped when I noticed this book at the Decatur branch.  “Flo-Jo!” I exclaimed…in a whisper (I was still in a library). I’m really liking this book so far because, like all For Dummies books, it’s great for the absolute beginner or the lapsed intermediate like myself.  It’s a great reminder of the rewards, the challenges and the simple mechanics of running. Plus, it doesn’t hurt that this book was co-authored by one of the greatest (and most glamorous) legends of the sport.

Think Fast: Mental Toughness Training for Running by Joe Henderson— There is no doubt that running requires physical strength and endurance but, as my old cross country coach would remind me, running is as much a mental sport as it is a physical sport. This book offers great wisdom for keeping your focus while running and also gives good advice on pushing yourself to “the next level” of more challenging, demanding workouts. While this particular book is geared more toward competitive and seasoned runners, this book can also be quite to the beginner in need of extra motivation.

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